The Wire–Season Three and All

NM has some thoughts about Season Three of the Wire, which remain unshared because some of y’all haven’t seen season three yet.  To that end, I’m designating this post and the ensuing comments the place for The Wire discussions that include season three and speculation on season four.


Enter the comments, then, at your own caution.


To get us started, I will say that I both like that we probably won’t ever see the Sobotkas again and that it makes me sad.  Same for Avon, I think.  I’m also stunned that we don’t see many of the actors from The Wire in other things now–well, unless you watch a lot of hip hop & R&B videos.  Also, Stringer Bell is amazing every time he’s on screen and I hope we get around to talking about Omar, though I’m not sure where to start with him.

17 thoughts on “The Wire–Season Three and All

  1. Well, two out of the three Sobotkas are indisposed. There’s only Nick. I hope they do try and work him in somewhere.Or someone should write a movie about his vengeful search for Spiros and the Greek. It would likely be UnWire-like but fun nonetheless.

  2. Yeah, but Nick’s cooperation got Ziggy something, didn’t it? God, that Zig. What a dumbass. Though I love when he pulls his penis out at the bar.As for Omar, I love him. I wonder if we’ll have occassion to see him again in 4.

  3. Aunt B., you are almost as indulgent as my Aunt Gertrude used to be, and she was my most indulgent aunt ever. (Although you are a much, much younger aunt. Just imagine how indulgent you’ll be once you get to be older.) You make me feel very special.So, OK, my thought from Season 3 that I didn’t want to discuss for fear of spoilers was this. You know how McNulty figures out that D’Angelo was murdered, and he tells Brianna. It isn’t clear (probably not even to him) whether he hopes she will make a stink and get the case re-opened, or whether he is just upset and wants to share with someone else who would logically also be upset. And she is stone-faced in front of him, and he concludes (and the audience is allowed to conclude) that she is just a cold bitch with no human emotions–doesn’t care if her son was murdered, just so it doesn’t interfere with the family business. But later, when Avon is out of prison she mentions it to him. Then she lets it drop. Towards the end of the season, Stringer Bell* tells Avon that he did order D’Angelo killed. They get into a little fistfight about it, but Avon’s heart clearly isn’t in it. He just can’t get worked up about it.**Now, whom is the audience set up to blame the most here? Stringer, for ordering the hit just on the chance that some day D’Angelo may testify against the gang, even though he has gone to prison rather than do so ? Avon, for not caring that his nephew was murdered? Or Brianna? Why, Brianna, of course–because she’s the woman. She’s supposed to have the emotions, while men are naturally expected to be violent unfeeling thugs. So she’s more blameworthy than the murderer.At least it seems to me that the show sets it up for viewers to feel that way.*How cool is Idris Ebla? Maybe they could do a Six Feet Under thing and have his ghost come back? I have seen him in some other stuff, but mostly movies, not TV.**Unless I’m reading this wrong. As I type, it occus to me that maybe finding that out is what takes the heart out of Avon, and why he passively goes along with letting Stringer be killed, and why he doesn’t fight at the end when the cops break in to arrest him.

  4. Kleinheider: "Well, two out of the three Sobotkas are indisposed. There’s only Nick. I hope they do try and work him in somewhere."He’s got a toddler, right? And this season is supposed to be about schools. So maybe he’ll show up as one of the parents.Aunt B.: "As for Omar, I love him. I wonder if we’ll have occassion to see him again in 4."He must show up again. He must. He quotes Steve Earle, and everything.

  5. Have my fingers in my ears and am screaming "lalalala" past all your other comments, since I’m stuck waiting for Monday to gorge on Season 3.But I would like to state how much, with six episodes into Season 2 under my belt, that the current story of Stringer Bell and (my second favourite character) D’Angelo Barksdale is just totally reminding me of Kind David and Uriah. And I groove on the way they’ve found a way to make that story fit in this world. And Omar is the greatest. And if I had $50 right now, it’d be BLOWN on Season 3 DVDs from Best Buy. I look forward to re-haunting this thread after next week. ;-p

  6. King David is a little more disingenuous about things than Stringer, but yeah.I like a show that continually makes a viewer make these connections. I don’t know another TV show that works so well at so many levels–maybe the only TV show I’ve ever watched that I would call art in the same way a novel can be.

  7. I agree. It does feel more like a novel than a tv show. Maybe that’s why it’s never really caught on with the general public.As for McNulty and Brianna… I knew there was no way she was going to break in front of McNulty, but I also thought, throughout the show, that her love for D. was complicated.I mean, there’s a world in which the men do see women mostly as whores or mothers. If Brianna in the first season wanted to actually be recognized by the men, she had to constantly reaffirm her status as D.’s mother.What’s interesting in season two, after the death of D., we see Stringer go to her regularly for advice or to formulate plans. She’s a person in her own right.So, I think the thing between her and McNulty is complicated both because I think we get hints repeatedly that she’s the real badass in the family and would have been a formitable head of the Barksdale crew if she’d been able and so she wasn’t about to really bond with a police. But I also think that she doesn’t show any emotion because she’s moved into a position where she’s a person outside of her relationship to D.On a totally different note, I love how Omar is both one of the most vivid, most real characters and how, even in the confines of the show, he’s something of a myth.

  8. Well I’m still only half way through season 1 (poor Kemma), but I’m here anyway because I wanted to know. Too bad about D’Angelo.

  9. "As for McNulty and Brianna… I knew there was no way she was going to break in front of McNulty, but I also thought, throughout the show, that her love for D. was complicated."Oh, no way would I have expected her to break down in front of him, or say a word to him that he wanted to hear. He’s the enemy, after all. But afterwards? Or with her brother? I would have expected … I don’t know, not tears necessarily, but possibly some bitterness. I think we are supposed to notice big time that she never shows any emotion about it all.Because saying her love for D. is complicated is just a more polite way of saying that her loyalty to the imperitives of the gang life that gives her her lifestyle is greater than her loyalty to her son. "I mean, there’s a world in which the men do see women mostly as whores or mothers. If Brianna in the first season wanted to actually be recognized by the men, she had to constantly reaffirm her status as D.’s mother."What’s interesting in season two, after the death of D., we see Stringer go to her regularly for advice or to formulate plans. She’s a person in her own right."I don’t see it that way. I think she’s gone from being Mother Of D. to being Sister Of Avon. By consulting her (or at least keeping her in the loop, because he doesn’t really ask her for advice, just assent), Avon is symbolizing his continued loyalty to Avon in Avon’s absence. She’s a fascinating character, anyway. Have you noticed that unlike the girlfriends, she dresses and acts completely middle class? Like Stringer, she’s aiming for something different than a richer version of what she came from. I guess we’ve seen the last of her because I can’t see how they will work her into the new season.

  10. Ooo. You’ve got me thinking that the reason she doesn’t show any emotion is that to show emotion means to risk being cut off from that life. Once everyone’s dead or in jail, though? I can’t remember. Doesn’t she leave the courtroom as Avon’s facing trial? I guess I didn’t see her as not having any emotion about it.I just assumed she was continuing to contrive the best possible instance to express it.But, yes, there’s something really interesting about how class plays out on the drug side of the story and how both she and Stringer seem to get that changing class doesn’t just have to do with making money.I want to know if Omar and Kima are the first gay people on TV. I kind of suspect that they are. I can’t think of other characters where their homosexuality was an intrinsic part of who they are as people, but not solely who they are and has there every been a gay guy like Omar, whose strength and bad-assness aren’t played like it’s weird that he’s strong and bad-ass because he’s gay?

  11. "He’s got a toddler, right? And this season is supposed to be about schools. So maybe he’ll show up as one of the parents."Oh, good point! Ashley Sobotka maybe she can kill Spiros in my fantasy movie.

  12. "So, I think the thing between her and McNulty is complicated both because I think we get hints repeatedly that she’s the real badass in the family and would have been a formitable head of the Barksdale crew if she’d been able and so she wasn’t about to really bond with a police. But I also think that she doesn’t show any emotion because she’s moved into a position where she’s a person outside of her relationship to D."Exactly, she absolutely cares for D. I wouldn’t even call it complicated. It is complicated only by the gangster codes she is forced to abide maybe but her love is unquestionable in my mind.

  13. "Exactly, she absolutely cares for D. I wouldn’t even call it complicated. "It is complicated only by the gangster codes she is forced to abide maybe but her love is unquestionable in my mind."Pressuring your child into spending decades in prison rather than rat out the gang is unquestionable love?

  14. Oooo. But who specifically in the gang? Her brother.I’m not trying to let her off the hook. I’m just saying that to even begin to understand her, you have to try to understand how entangled the gang life and her family life are.

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