The Side Flower Beds

I was complaining today about the beds between our house and Bobby’s, which are completely overgrown with weeds and which kind of got destroyed in the great flood of 09. Whenever I go out to look at them, I think, you know, I could just mow everything down and let it go to grass.

But there are some gorgeous lilies in there and some beautiful irises.   And it’s a good, sunny spot.

And the whole yard will probably not regularly flood like that again.

Still, I’m a little distraught over the state of it.

And the person I was complaining about it to says, “And fall will kill those weeds soon enough.”

Maybe it’s just the kind of day I’m having but it felt like wisdom.

So, advise me on this, internet. Will my marigolds reseed themselves? I noticed that I have some baby marigolds just coming up even this late in the season. Will seeds that fall overwinter and grow up next year, do you think? Is overwinter a word?

Wouldn’t it be nice if it was?

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2 thoughts on “The Side Flower Beds

  1. What zone are you in? We’ve had volunteer marigolds re-seed sometimes, but not reliably up here. Your luck may be better. You can also let the plants go to seed, collect the seeds once they’ve matured, and replant next year.
    If you’ve got irises and lilies, you might as well just take the plunge and make it a perennial bed. Not sure what makes it down there (coral bells are pretty), but that makes that set of beds more low-maintenance. Throw some mulch around the plants and you’re golden.
    For reliable re-seeding, get some datura. Just DO NOT EAT THE SEEDS. The scent is incredible, they attract bees, and the flowers/seed pods are just amazing.
    Overwinter is completely and totally a word. Yay!

  2. I agree, marigolds are unreliable reseeders. There is also the issue of hybrids, which may make the marigolds that do reseed quite unlike their parents. If you have an old fashioned variety that will reproduce properly you’ll have really good luck collecting the seeds for next year. I had a raging sucess with four o’ clocks reseeding – you’ll get the same color as the parents and they are very heat tolerant.

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