I Woke Up Still Fuming at McWherter

Okay, let’s look at this again:

McWherter does support the ban, and feels that having parents of the opposite sex is better for a child. He says that the Department of Children’s Services reports to the governor, so as governor, he would be responsible for children in need of this service. I followed up by asking if he felt that foster care by an opposite-sex couple was better than adoption by a same-sex couple, and he said that he did.

Here’s the thing. I don’t expect everyone in this state, not even all the Democrats in this state, to be okay or comfortable with gay people.  Years of oppressing and slandering gay people to the point where any of them that can get the hell out of Dodge do get the hell out of Dodge means that the bigots get to be bigoted mostly unchallenged and ideas are entrenched.

I do expect Democrats to stand on the side of not letting their own grave shortcomings as people stand in the way of other people’s well-being.

Would it have been so hard for the following to have happened?

McWherter does not support the ban, even though he feels that having parents of the opposite sex is better for a child. He says that the Department of Children’s Services reports to the governor, so as governor, he would be responsible for children in need and he believes that getting children in loving and stable homes should be the State’s top priority; he doesn’t want children languishing in the system when there are homes for them. I followed up by asking if he felt that foster care by an opposite-sex couple was better than adoption by a same-sex couple, and he said that he did, but that he would not stand in the way of children being placed in loving homes no matter what their make-up.

He could still be wrong. He could still be homophobic. But he would be espousing a Democratic position.

The fact that he can’t do that tells you something.

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11 thoughts on “I Woke Up Still Fuming at McWherter

  1. Pingback: Getting Crossways On Gay Adoption : Post Politics: Political News and Views in Tennessee

  2. I am going to use the argument that I used with my Grandma when we spoke about miscegenation.

    When are we going to start allowing adoption based on the content of someone’s character?

    Let’s face it, plenty of hetero couples shouldn’t be allowed near children let alone raise them. And ditto for same sex couples.

    But just the opposite is true for both hetero and same sex couples.

  3. Yes, Mary. Yes, indeed. See, we do agree about certain things.

    If we had “state approved” foster parents line up and march in the Christmas parade, you see things at least as shocking as when the “we’re here; we’re queer” coalition takes to the streets.

  4. Joe – The problem with you’re analogy is twofold: one, the “we’re here; we’re queer” coalition doesn’t shock me, and two, I haven’t seen any “Adopt a Child Here” booths set up at any parade recently.

  5. Joe, Watching other people’s idea of fun sex can be awkward. But the Gay Rights parades are also a celebration of what it means to be a truly free nation: mind your own damn business.

    I, too, hate the “I know a gay person/parents argument,” but I do know a few. I know of two kids, one a student at my college, and another the daughter of a friend whose wife left him for another woman. Both kids are well adapted, good students, and good people who have bright futures.

    The worst thing about their upbringing has been the bigots who wouldn’t let their children go to a birthday party in a gay home. And the children of bigots who insulted them at school. Grow up America.

  6. Now, wait a second, don’t be so dismissive of the “I know a gay person/gay parents argument.” The fact that more and more people know gay people (or, perhaps, know that people they know are gay) has been the primary reason for the progress that gays have made thus far. That’s because “anti-gay” sentiment is not a “head/reason” position. It’s a “heart/emotion” position. The only way to change that is by actual contact, not with arguments.

  7. Roger,

    Good point. I just didn’t want to sound cliche. Certainly, living around and working with gay folks early in my life changed me.

  8. I am not shocked by Gay Pride parades either. Very little in the way of social expression. I am simply referring to the reaction the opponents to gay adoption would likely have if they applied their biased, visual criteria to our government-sponsored alternative.

  9. Casey —

    Yeah, it’s just one of those things. In most cases, personal experience (or the lack thereof) is what primarily determines folks’ positions on this issue.

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